About your Search

20130115
20130123
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
a new plan to eliminate the debt ceiling, claiming the gop is exploiting the issue for political gain. doug mckelway is live in washington with more on the democratic plan and the road ahead. hi, doug. >> reporter: hi, jenna. this democratic plan in a nutshell would basically do away with the statute that calls for the debt ceiling in the first place, allowing spending in effect to go up and up and up without the artificial cap that the debt ceiling is indeed. democrats are explaining this in a press conference right now as we speak, so we'll be learning a lot more about it as the day progresses. republicans obviously deeply opposed to this thing, fearful that democrats will indeed use it to allow spending to go up and up. here is senator john barrasso speaking on fox news this morning. >> we have a spending problem in this country. people all across the country know it. they know it in wyoming. families have to balance their budget every year. many states do. we do in wyoming. it is time for the senate and the house and the president to get serious about limiting our spending and spe
a vote that will delay the debt ceiling for three months. so what they are doing, if you really look at house republicans who took the majority two years ago, they did it standing on principle for pretty much every squirmish. it seems that they are becoming a bit more sophisticated, rather, but their understanding, it seems, is that you have to pick your battles. losing credit ratings and so forth, that's not a smart battle to wage. look at some of the most conservative members of the house talking to deirdre walsh at the end of their retreat for three days about picking their battles in a better way. >> deal with the smaller ones first, maybe build up a little momentum, credibility, not only with the credit markets but with the folks back home, that we can actually deal with these things, take the small one first, debt ceiling last, i think it's a rational, reasonable thing to do. >> now, for some, wolf, maybe even those in the republican house leadership, like him talking about what is rational and reasonable, that may be a bit jarring but the house republicans are coming out of th
, martha, where they're cot delling together what could be a three-month extension of the debt ceiling to try to hammer out more spending cuts and coupled with chuck schumer, the man in charge of today's big inaugural event, more tax hikes. a lot of bruising to come as far as they settle this but they are a long way from settling it. martha: neil, that raises a bigger question. you look at the second term of fdr who dealt with obviously severe economic distress in this country. what happened was they relapsed. there is lot of concern if we do continue to raise taxes and small business owners who the president said are one of his priorities in the second term, but if their sense is their taxes are going higher, they will continue to pull in and get smaller and leaner and not hire i would imagine. so the big question is, where is the whole economy going to head if taxes are increased in other ways in this country? >> well you know the president spoke to quickly come back at the notion, if wall street is worried about this and companies are worried about this, investors are worried about
of saying hey, we're not going to lift the debt ceiling, you say, yeah, we will for three months and then go ahead and pass a budget in that time period. is that possible? >> i sure hope so. obviously that's the goal. that's been my goal for the last 18 months since i've been in the senate. obviously to push the senate to do something. as you mentioned, we haven't had a budget for almost four years. washington, d.c i think we can agree on one thing, that the worst run institution in america right now is the united states congress. we need to do something different. >> brian: so to do that, you got to get to some control over your own colleagues and to do that, hold on to their paycheck. republicans like darrell issa say i think that's unconstitutional. >> there is a lot of people in washington, d.c. that obviously don't want to cut their pay. the purpose of that constitutional amendment was to make sure that members of congress didn't enrich themselves during the legislative session. i'll tell this to darrell issa and nails wants to make this argument. cut your pay and go back to your distri
and file about a short-term extension of the nation's debt ceiling. it might be brief, authorization the nation's borrowing authority for a couple of months at the republican retreat in williamsburg, virginia right now. the house budget committee chairman, paul ryan says it might offer a better chance of getting the democratic-controlled senate and white house involved in talks without a deal by march. drastic spending cuts could kick in and the government could face a possible shutdown. there seems to be kate a little movement on that. we'll see how far it goes. >> when they all get back. >>> a key part of every u.s. president's swearing in is of course the bible that he has placed, that he places his hand on when placing the oath of office. cnn's lisa sylvester had a pretty rare look and was able to actually look and touch the bible. >> touched it yourself. >> i've got to say, this was a pretty cool assignment. >> it's very unique and a really neat part of the inauguration. >> this is something that i learned. the library of congress actually has 1,500 bibles in i
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)